Native but aggressive cattails managed by wintertime controlled burns

Uploaded by on Jan 10, 2012  | Illinois Lake County Forest Preserve Burnt Off An Area At North Point Marina in order to control the cattails.

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CONTROLLING CATTAILS: The acreage of cattail-dominated wetlands in the United States has increased drastically since the early twentieth century due to changes in hydrology and land use. The optimal control technique for a given site will depend on the hydrologic state of the site, the size of the area to be managed, and if the manager is able to manipulate water levels.

Prescribed Burning: Most cattail marshes must be burned in winter or before significant growth has occurred in spring; these are generally the only times when fuels are dry enough to carry a fire, although frozen ground or saturated soil may impede the fire’s progress through the cattail duff. Fire is most effective as a control method when followed by naturally or artificially high water levels in the spring to smother residual stalks.

From the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

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Prairie/wet meadow prescribed burn explained in restoration video

Acorus Restoration  |  Aug. 13, 2011  |  At Acorus Restoration, a native plant nursery located in Southern Ontario, Paul Morris explains the role of fire in the preservation of different natural habitats.

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Prescribed burn prevents trees from colonizing arboretum prairie

umsnre | December 9, 2010 | Students in SNRE professor Bob Grese’s Ecological Restoration course conduct a controlled burn in Dow Field in Nichols Arboretum, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
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Wildflower Center starts time-lapse coverage of prescribed fire and native plant growth

wildflowercenter | November 12, 2010 | Our Gallery Meadow or Savanna Meadow three months after a prescribed burn showing regrowth and suppression of invasive species. Narrated by John Hart Asher.
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Volunteers sow native seed at Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

wildflowercenter | October 20, 2010 | Seeds of native Texas wildflowers were spread across the Savanna Meadow by Wildflower Center staff soon after a prescribed fire was carried out in August. With ample rain, the meadow should be flush with wildflowers in the spring.
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Controlled burn recorded in time-lapse video at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

wildflowercenter | August 5, 2010 |  This is a time-lapse video of the maintenance prescribed burn of the savanna meadows at the Wildflower Center.
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Southern Appalachians had a history of fire until 250 years ago

Score another point for prescribed burning. A new U.S. Forest Service study examining 4,000 years of fire history of the voluptuous terrain in western North Carolina concludes that regular burning was inherent to its ecosystem. Further, the study showed, fire suppression by immigrant culture has altered the vegetation dramatically in the past couple hundred years. Read more here.

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Controlled burning of some Western forests might help reduce our carbon footprint

You read that correctly: reduce the U.S. carbon footprint. According to newly released findings from a National Science Foundation-funded study, prescribed burns to reduce underbrush could be used to protect larger trees and thereby reduce the larger amount of carbon released by wildfires that burn volumes of woody species indiscriminately. Read more here.

Seen above: An Ann Arbor Natural Area Preservation prescribed forest burn. Although the study mentioned above relates to Western U.S. forests, the guys and gals who do the work look a lot like the yellow-suited folks in this photo from Michigan. flickr.com/bluishbarn

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